"A national disgrace"

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Comments update: Italian architect Renzo Piano, designer of The Shard in London, unveiled a new skyscraper proposal for the city last week – and readers weren't impressed. Read on for more on this and explore our comments page to keep up to date with the latest discussions.

Out of tune: Piano's 224-metre cylindrical tower aims to do for Paddington "what The Shard did for London Bridge" and bring new commercial activity to the area, according to its developer.

"Paddington is already buzzing and one of London's best-known and central areas," wrote Alvaro. "All it needs is proper urban planning and sensible projects, not new towers with unaffordable flats and expensive restaurants."

"The complete abdication of sensible zoning by City Hall is a national disgrace," added Alan. "The tower itself is perfectly fine, the location is frankly ridiculous."

Others mocked what appeared to be a lonely tree depicted in the skyscraper's "sky garden", and one reader expressed concern over whether the tower could ever blend with its surroundings. Read the comments on this story »


My Micro NY apartment building by nArchitectsMy Micro NY apartment building by nArchitects

Micro budget: a modular tower designed to offer a solution to New York's affordable housing shortage with micro apartments is doomed to fail despite being noble in its aims, said readers.

"In six months these will hold a value that is out of reach for the very people it was designed for," said a commenter calling themselves Doubtfuldodger.

"We as architects play the victim card when it comes to high costs of living in cities we design and play a huge role in developing," added Remod. "We challenge the status quo for everything other than the tired and old concept of 'the dense city'."

"You're calling for making less desirable locations more attractive?" responded Hans Gerwitz. "I'm all for that, assuming the locations in question share some of the social and environmental benefits of cities."